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Tour de France

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1 Tour de France on Thu Jun 29 2017, 19:21

Sluffy

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Starts on Saturday.

Froome probably the man to beat but he's not shown any real form going into the race. Porte is the man who has but something always seems to go wrong for him. Quintana is the man to fear but he has already ridden the gruelling Tour of Italy this season.

I'll be watching it as usual.

Anybody else from Nuts interested?

2 Re: Tour de France on Thu Jun 29 2017, 19:49

boltonbonce

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Only Breadman. Razz

3 Re: Tour de France on Fri Jun 30 2017, 21:54

bwfc71

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Ivan Campo
Ivan Campo
Agree Froome may not be fit enough for the gruel, this year, and somehow think it could be the year for Quintana.

Definitely be watching, again, tis year.  Only decent thing on this summer.

4 Re: Tour de France on Fri Jun 30 2017, 21:59

boltonbonce

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse

5 Re: Tour de France on Sat Jul 01 2017, 23:13

Sluffy

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Fantastic opening stage of the Tour with Welshman Geraint Thomas winning and taking the 'yellow jersey', Chris Froome coming in sixth and taking half a minute off his nearest rivals and (sadly) one of the major favourites (Spain's Valverde) crashing out with a broken knee cap - ouch!

Only day one and three more weeks to come so loads will change but a good start for 'us' all the same.

6 Re: Tour de France on Tue Jul 04 2017, 18:32

Sluffy

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Wow Peter Sagan (the best cyclist in the world - people like Froome should probably be considered the best 'all-around' cyclists in the world) has just be disqualified from the Tour for sticking his elbow out and bringing down Cavendish in todays sprint finish.





A very brief video of it here -

http://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/racing/tour-de-france/five-talking-points-from-stage-four-of-the-tour-de-france-2-339508


Out of character for Sagan and I guess he must have had his reasons for doing it.


Sagan is an wonderful rider and only yesterday won a sprint finish even though he pulled his foot out of the binding to the pedal and had to re-clip' himself, during the actual sprint itself! Amazing stuff.

Brief clip of him doing it here -

http://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/racing/tour-de-france/peter-sagan-lucky-find-pedals-tour-win-339370


Wonder if we've heard the last of this?

Hope Cavendish is ok?

7 Re: Tour de France on Tue Jul 04 2017, 18:34

boltonbonce

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Cavendish got a bit of his own medicine there.

8 Re: Tour de France on Tue Jul 04 2017, 22:53

boltonbonce

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Cavendish out with broken shoulder.

9 Re: Tour de France on Tue Jul 04 2017, 22:54

Reebok Trotter

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
It's bloody brutal is this race. It's virtually impossible to come out of it unscathed no matter how good you are.

10 Re: Tour de France on Tue Jul 04 2017, 23:02

Sluffy

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boltonbonce wrote:Cavendish out with broken shoulder.

Shame, I thought he was doing enough to possibly pick up a stage or two on this Tour.

It didn't look good with the crash being on his 'bad' shoulder.

Seems time is now running out to beat Merckx Tour win record.

Tough record to beat though.

11 Re: Tour de France on Tue Jul 04 2017, 23:23

Sluffy

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Reebok Trotter wrote:It's bloody brutal is this race. It's virtually impossible to come out of it unscathed no matter how good you are.

That's part of the theatre about it for me.

It's so random, anything and everything can happen - and sometimes does!

I say it every year but those who can't be arsed about the Tour really do miss out on one of the greatest annual sports events. The Tour has so many plots and sub plots, that change day by day and every now and again an unexpected spanner gets thrown in to the middle of things.

It's great fun really.

12 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 12:12

Reebok Trotter

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I see Sagan has been disqualified. Serves the bugger right!

13 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 12:22

boltonbonce

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Reebok Trotter wrote:I see Sagan has been disqualified. Serves the bugger right!
Live by the sword,die by the sword.

Cavendish isn't behind the door when it comes to this sort of stuff.

14 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 13:22

Sluffy

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boltonbonce wrote:
Reebok Trotter wrote:I see Sagan has been disqualified. Serves the bugger right!
Live by the sword,die by the sword.

Cavendish isn't behind the door when it comes to this sort of stuff.

He doesn't have to be with team mates like this!

Very Happy



15 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 13:30

boltonbonce

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Shocked

16 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 13:34

Natasha Whittam

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
It's bloody boring until the last 30 seconds when everyone puts a shift in.

17 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 13:39

Sluffy

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boltonbonce wrote:Shocked

Another example of the 'black arts' is also cleverly demonstrated on this video.

If you watch the head-butting cyclist (Mark Renshaw) AFTER he's put his nut in, watch how he cleverly 'stops' the cyclist who ended up finishing third, by deliberately swerving to his left to and thus forcing the rider to step off the gas at a crucial time in his attempt to catch Cavendish.

The slow motion overhead shot shows this beautifully.

The Tour really is pure theatre.

18 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 13:43

Sluffy

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Natasha Whittam wrote:It's bloody boring until the last 30 seconds when everyone puts a shift in.


Not always.

A key stage in the Tour today, it is the first mountain top finish (one of only three this year) and will force the riders who seriously want to win the Tour to get their finger out long before the last 30 seconds.

Should be a cracker of a day's racing.

19 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 14:23

observer


Tony Kelly
Tony Kelly
Natasha Whittam wrote:It's bloody boring until the last 30 seconds when everyone puts a shift in.

As Sluffy has told you, it is team strategy as well as a variety of tortuous venues... including grade 5 climbs that separate the elite from the others... downhills off those climbs that are not for the faint hearted... and thousands of people pushing you as you head up the mountains. There are time trials when it is you against the clock... and there are twists and turns as the weather elements change from day-to-day. The scenic beauty of the countryside always makes for wonderful pictures... and yes, it can come down to the final sprint of most stages, but for those who are in the know, there are many other things to watch... and beautiful scenics for those who are not in the know. It's unfortunate that doping has clouded the sport... but if you spend one day traveling up Alpe D'Huez, you will understand the mania that sweeps France during this event.

20 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 16:32

Natasha Whittam

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I don't doubt it's exciting if you're competing in the sport, but I'd put it "up" there with snooker and bowls as TV entertainment.

21 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 16:55

observer


Tony Kelly
Tony Kelly
Natasha Whittam wrote:I don't doubt it's exciting if you're competing in the sport, but I'd put it "up" there with snooker and bowls as TV entertainment.

Take the train to one of the mountain stages... pack a lunch... sit alongside the road... and you might find yourself embracing the sport. Watching the mad Frenchmen and women run alongside the riders is something that you don't see every day. Watch the caravan of advertisers precede the cyclists and you will experience something else that is novel in the world of sports.

The towns that the tour starts and finishes at all pay money for the privilege of hosting a tour. You won't find a room in any of those towns on race day... but the excitement of all those people in medieval villages is truly pleasurable.

Yes, it is different than the frenetic pace of football... but to witness it in person might give you a different perspective... but you still would not watch it on television, which doesn't translate the sport as well. Still... to be there... is truly blissful... especially on July 14th (le quatorze de juillet)... when all of France celebrates. We sat outside a small village having lunch one year, and it was really fun to watch the tour fly by. The lunch and wine were not bad either! Try it!

22 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 17:03

Natasha Whittam

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
observer wrote:Take the train to one of the mountain stages... pack a lunch... sit alongside the road... and you might find yourself embracing the sport.  

I'm sorry, but that's a load of rubbish.

How can anyone get excited sitting at the site of the road watching bikes whizz past? One bike is exactly the same as the next. Surely you'd get the same experience if you brought a packed lunch and sat on the side of the A6.

And you don't even get to see who wins!

It's a bit like going to a football match but not being able to see either net.

23 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 17:06

boltonbonce

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Nat on a bike.

24 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 18:23

xmiles

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Ivan Campo
Ivan Campo
Natasha Whittam wrote:I don't doubt it's exciting if you're competing in the sport, but I'd put it "up" there with snooker and bowls as TV entertainment.

Don't forget golf and darts. How they can be described as spectator sports is simply beyond me.

25 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 18:57

Reebok Trotter

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
xmiles wrote:
Natasha Whittam wrote:I don't doubt it's exciting if you're competing in the sport, but I'd put it "up" there with snooker and bowls as TV entertainment.

Don't forget golf and darts. How they can be described as spectator sports is simply beyond me.

I love watching golf and darts. Looking forward to the Open. As for darts, the venues for competitions are always sold out...

26 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 19:52

observer


Tony Kelly
Tony Kelly
Natasha Whittam wrote:
observer wrote:Take the train to one of the mountain stages... pack a lunch... sit alongside the road... and you might find yourself embracing the sport.  

I'm sorry, but that's a load of rubbish.

How can anyone get excited sitting at the site of the road watching bikes whizz past? One bike is exactly the same as the next. Surely you'd get the same experience if you brought a packed lunch and sat on the side of the A6.

And you don't even get to see who wins!

It's a bit like going to a football match but not being able to see either net.

Remember, Nat is always right... but:

3.5 billion people watch the tour on television
188 countries carry the coverage
2,000 journalists are accredited to cover the event
12 million spectators watch the tour from some point along the route
30% of the spectators are women

So to answer your question... How could anyone get excited... ask one of the 12 million along the route. It may not be your cup of tea, but it is certainly a formidable sport to many. I expect to see you by the M6 later this week with your lunch.

27 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 20:53

Natasha Whittam

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
observer wrote:Remember, Nat is always right... but:

3.5 billion people watch the tour on television
188 countries carry the coverage
2,000 journalists are accredited to cover the event
12 million spectators watch the tour from some point along the route
30% of the spectators are women

So to answer your question... How could anyone get excited... ask one of the 12 million along the route.  It may not be your cup of tea, but it is certainly a formidable sport to many.  I expect to see you by the M6 later this week with your lunch.  

The people who watch it are the people who live there. If the Red Arrows started flying around my penthouse I'd watch from my window - but if they were flying 2 miles down the road I wouldn't bother.

And let's be honest, most of those spectators are just folk walking to work or the shops.

If the Tour went to North Korea for a year how many of those French folk would travel to watch it? None.

28 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 21:18

observer


Tony Kelly
Tony Kelly
Natasha Whittam wrote:
observer wrote:Remember, Nat is always right... but:

3.5 billion people watch the tour on television
188 countries carry the coverage
2,000 journalists are accredited to cover the event
12 million spectators watch the tour from some point along the route
30% of the spectators are women

So to answer your question... How could anyone get excited... ask one of the 12 million along the route.  It may not be your cup of tea, but it is certainly a formidable sport to many.  I expect to see you by the M6 later this week with your lunch.  

The people who watch it are the people who live there. If the Red Arrows started flying around my penthouse I'd watch from my window - but if they were flying 2 miles down the road I wouldn't bother.

And let's be honest, most of those spectators are just folk walking to work or the shops.

If the Tour went to North Korea for a year how many of those French folk would travel to watch it? None.

Perhaps you should consider that 2,000,000 of your countrymen turned out to see the Tour de France the last time it visited England... obviously you not being one of them in 2007. Your observation that most of the spectators are just folks walking to work or shops in absolutely wrong... they travel an average of 80 miles and line the streets... it is actually an event when the tour goes through towns. Most people take the day off and make it a holiday when the tour comes. So your arguments hold little credence to reality... and I'm not a big cycling aficianado... just one who has been there more than once and has actually seen the event over the course of a month. It's quite remarkable and while the Tour will not go to Korea, it has gone to neighboring countries and produced equally large crowds.

Since the cities pay a fee to host the start of the Tour, you should believe they expect a benefit from hosting it. The following have hosted the start or will host it in coming years...



1954: Amsterdam, Netherlands
1958: Brussels, Belgium
1965: Cologne, West Germany
1973: Scheveningen, Netherlands
1975: Charleroi, Belgium
1978: Leiden, Netherlands
1980: Frankfurt, West Germany
1982: Basel, Switzerland
1987: West Berlin, West Germany
1989: Luxembourg, Luxembourg
1992: San Sebastián, Spain
1996: Den Bosch, Netherlands
1998: Dublin, Ireland
2002: Luxembourg, Luxembourg
2004: Liège, Belgium
2007: London, United Kingdom
2009: Monte Carlo, Monaco
2010: Rotterdam, Netherlands
2012: Liège, Belgium
2014: Leeds, United Kingdom
2015: Utrecht, Netherlands
2017: Düsseldorf, Germany
2019: Brussels, Belgium

Add the neighboring countries that the Tour has visited, even for a few minutes, and you should readily see there is a worldwide demand for the event. You rail against others who do not attend football games, and here you rail against a sport you have not seen in person. It truly is a spectacle... and I might have said the things you are saying before I went to my first Tour... but remarkably it changed my opinion. Even with the drug scandals, riding up the Alpe d'Huez is a gruesome and harrowing experience. You should try it in a car one day and you might have some respect for the difficulty involved. Seeing it on race day would further enlighten you to the passions of those who follow the sport.

29 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 21:39

Natasha Whittam

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I've no idea how far the bikers cycled when the Tour was in England, but I'm guessing they went past thousands of houses and businesses. Of course people are going to pop outside for a quick look.

30 Re: Tour de France on Wed Jul 05 2017, 22:50

Reebok Trotter

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Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
What I genuinely admire about Observer is that he is intelligent enough to always put forward a good case in any debate. Most posters either agree or disagree without expanding too much on the how or why, unlike Observer who actually articulates his point of view with salient facts.

I can remember some time ago there was a thread about the death of Meredith Kercher and in my opinion he absolutely nailed it.  
Refreshing.  :like:

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