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Brexit negotiations

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181Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 10:24

wessy

wessy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
Unlike most Labour members i DO NOT want a general election. The Tories are very good at shifting blame (World Global financial crash).
This is a Tory mess started by Cameron for a quick fix to sort out the Tory rebels on Europe, that went well !!
The shambolic way they have put party over country needs to come at a price, the price being that they led us to the worst possible deal and are culpable and the blame lies firmly at there door, hopefully for the next decade.
This party who still live in the last century (Rees Mogg) should be taking the rightful blame. Shit sticks .

182Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 10:28

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
I also would prefer a second referendum to an election for the same reason.

In addition I still think Corbyn is an electoral liability despite his apparent attraction for some younger voters. Otherwise why are Labour still neck and neck with the Tories in the polls.

183Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 10:32

karlypants

karlypants
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@xmiles wrote:Esther McVey has also resigned.

That will be music to many people's ears!

184Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 10:54

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
What a shambles. Time to bring in Big Sam.

185Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 11:42

wessy

wessy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
@karlypants wrote:
@xmiles wrote:Esther McVey has also resigned.

That will be music to many people's ears!
The question should be how the hell was she appointed

186Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 12:02

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
Funny how quiet Nat is now. Is she still dancing in the streets of Preston?

187Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 12:06

Natasha Whittam

Natasha Whittam
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I've chained myself to Chorley Town Hall in solidarity with our leader.

188Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 12:39

Cajunboy

Cajunboy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
@Cajunboy wrote:
@rammywhite wrote:Crunch time for Teresa May.

Here's my prediction.
She's presented her 'plan' (all 500 pages of it) to her cabinet and wants to get them all on board today. She'll fail.
Later this week she presents her plan to full parliamentary debate and the vote goes seriously against her.
By the end of the week she'll resign.

Am I right?
I think she will get the deal agreed by her cabinet today, but there may be the odd resignation today or in the next few days.

I do not see how she can get the deal through parliament though.

Although anything is possible.
She has to go!

189Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 21:09

Natasha Whittam

Natasha Whittam
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
She's sticking in there. What a woman!

190Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 22:34

Growler


Tony Kelly
Tony Kelly
I think you have to say its been a decent day for TM.
Raab and McVey weren't enough high profile resignations to get her ousted and she handled Parliament and her questions at Downing St very impressively.
There is a chance she will get a deal through Parliament, in fact i expect that after she goes back to the EU  and gets a few more crumbs from the table.When push comes to shove i don't think MPs will vote for no deal despite all their bluster today

191Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 15 2018, 23:07

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
The only way she can get this deal through parliament is if Corbyn backs it.

Even May concedes that there are 3 not 2 options: her deal, no deal, no brexit.

192Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Nov 16 2018, 02:52

wanderlust


Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Gove next to capitulate?
Wondering how many more rats are left on brexit’s sinking ship?

193Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Mon Nov 19 2018, 14:02

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
Here's an interesting point of view, recently posted on another forum.
Former Australian PM Tony Abbott...
"It’s pretty hard for Britain’s friends, here in Australia, to make sense of the mess that’s being made of Brexit. The referendum result was perhaps the biggest-ever vote of confidence in the United Kingdom, its past and its future. But the British establishment doesn’t seem to share that confidence and instead looks desperate to cut a deal, even if that means staying under the rule of Brussels. Looking at this from abroad, it’s baffling: the country that did the most to bring democracy into the modern world might yet throw away the chance to take charge of its own destiny.
Let’s get one thing straight: a negotiation that you’re not prepared to walk away from is not a negotiation — it’s surrender. It’s all give and no get. When David Cameron tried to renegotiate Britain’s EU membership, he was sent packing because Brussels judged (rightly) that he’d never actually back leaving. And since then, Brussels has made no real concessions to Theresa May because it judges (rightly, it seems) that she’s desperate for whatever deal she can get.
The EU’s palpable desire to punish Britain for leaving vindicates the Brexit project. Its position, now, is that there’s only one ‘deal’ on offer, whereby the UK retains all of the burdens of EU membership but with no say in setting the rules. The EU seems to think that Britain will go along with this because it’s terrified of no deal. Or, to put it another way, terrified of the prospect of its own independence.
But even after two years of fearmongering and vacillation, it’s not too late for robust leadership to deliver the Brexit that people voted for. It’s time for Britain to announce what it will do if the EU can’t make an acceptable offer by March 29 next year — and how it would handle no deal. Freed from EU rules, Britain would automatically revert to world trade, using rules agreed by the World Trade Organization. It works pretty well for Australia. So why on earth would it not work just as well for the world’s fifth-largest economy?
A world trade Brexit lets Britain set its own rules. It can say, right now, that it will not impose any tariff or quota on European produce and would recognise all EU product standards. That means no border controls for goods coming from Europe to Britain. You don’t need to negotiate this: just do it. If Europe knows what’s in its own best interests, it would fully reciprocate in order to maintain entirely free trade and full mutual recognition of standards right across Europe.
Next, the UK should declare that Europeans already living here should have the right to remain permanently — and, of course, become British citizens if they wish. This should be a unilateral offer. Again, you don’t need a deal. You don’t need Michel Barnier’s permission. If Europe knows what’s best for itself, it would likewise allow Britons to stay where they are.
Third, there should continue to be free movement of people from Europe into Britain — but with a few conditions. Only for work, not welfare. And with a foreign worker’s tax on the employer, to make sure anyone coming in would not be displacing British workers.
Fourth, no ‘divorce bill’ whatsoever should be paid to Brussels. The UK government would assume the EU’s property and liabilities in Britain, and the EU would assume Britain’s share of these in Europe. If Britain was getting its fair share, these would balance out; and if Britain wasn’t getting its fair share, it’s the EU that should be paying Britain.
Finally, there’s no need on Britain’s part for a hard border with Ireland. Britain wouldn’t be imposing tariffs on European goods, so there’s no money to collect. The UK has exactly the same product standards as the Republic, so let’s not pretend you need to check for problems we all know don’t exist. Some changes may be needed but technology allows for smart borders: there was never any need for a Cold War-style Checkpoint Charlie. Irish citizens, of course, have the right to live and work in the UK in an agreement that long predates EU membership.
Of course, the EU might not like this British leap for independence. It might hit out with tariffs and impose burdens on Britain as it does on the US — but WTO rules put a cap on any retaliatory action. The worst it can get? We’re talking levies of an average 4 or 5 per cent. Which would be more than offset by a post-Brexit devaluation of the pound (which would have the added bonus of making British goods more competitive everywhere).
UK officialdom assumes that a deal is vital, which is why so little thought has been put into how Britain might just walk away. Instead, officials have concocted lurid scenarios featuring runs on the pound, gridlock at ports, grounded aircraft, hoarding of medicines and flights of investment. It’s been the pre-referendum Project Fear campaign on steroids. And let’s not forget how employment, investment and economic growth ticked up after the referendum.
As a former prime minister of Australia and a lifelong friend of your country, I would say this: Britain has nothing to lose except the shackles that the EU imposes on it. After the courage shown by its citizens in the referendum, it would be a tragedy if political leaders go wobbly now. Britain’s future has always been global, rather than just with Europe. Like so many of Britain’s admirers, I want to see this great country seize this chance and make the most of it."
Tony Abbott served as Prime Minister of Australia from 2013 to 2015

194Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Mon Nov 19 2018, 15:45

Norpig

Norpig
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
I voted remain but reading the above is like a breath of fresh air and common sense. He talks a lot of sense as the current deal is no good for either side of the argument and there is too much scaremongering coming from both sides.

195Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Nov 20 2018, 11:41

Dunkels King

Dunkels King
Nicolas Anelka
Nicolas Anelka
@Norpig wrote:I voted remain but reading the above is like a breath of fresh air and common sense. He talks a lot of sense as the current deal is no good for either side of the argument and there is too much scaremongering coming from both sides.

There is a lot of good information in there but one or two things that don't add up and one that goes against what a LOT of people wanted Brexit for:

"Third, there should continue to be free movement of people from Europe into Britain — but with a few conditions. Only for work, not welfare. And with a foreign worker’s tax on the employer, to make sure anyone coming in would not be displacing British workers."

What, like they already do in Germany, and like the UK could have done as well ?

The other point is reference WTO. Of course Australia trades under WTO rules. For the UK to do the same it first has to negotiate trade deals with other Countries. It's like starting over. The only problem with that is it takes years, and it only takes one or two Countries to object for it to be scuppered. In the meantime whilst all these new trade deals are being negotiated, what do UK companies do ? On top of that, to actually get a deal in the first place the UK is going to have to find a way to undercut any deal that the EU made, and is that going to be worth it for the Country we would like to deal with ? It's fine if you have a product that is exclusive, but other than that it will be a struggle. Not many Countries will risk losing trade with the other 26 EU members just to satisfy the UK. I'm still scratching my head with regards to what the UK can export nowadays that will be significant. Most of the stuff manufactured in the UK uses components from the EU or further afield anyway, so that is also going to be a problem unless they go down the no tariff route with the EU, but that in itself defeats the idea of Brexit as it still means we are tied to the EU again.

196Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Nov 20 2018, 13:07

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
Some good points there DK. Whatever happens now, there will be change and turmoil, but I have faith in the British  character, and that we will overcome the problems. Admittedly some will be fixed quickly, and some will cause problems when sorted in the longer term. We didn't get to be the 5th  largest economy just because we are in the EU.

197Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Nov 20 2018, 13:12

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@gloswhite wrote:Some good points there DK. Whatever happens now, there will be change and turmoil, but I have faith in the British  character, and that we will overcome the problems. Admittedly some will be fixed quickly, and some will cause problems when sorted in the longer term. We didn't get to be the 5th  largest economy just because we are in the EU.
Not sure I have as much faith in the British 'character' as you Glos.

They'll need an app at the very least. Smile

198Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Nov 20 2018, 13:20

gloswhite

gloswhite
Jay Jay Okocha
Jay Jay Okocha
@boltonbonce wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:Some good points there DK. Whatever happens now, there will be change and turmoil, but I have faith in the British  character, and that we will overcome the problems. Admittedly some will be fixed quickly, and some will cause problems when sorted in the longer term. We didn't get to be the 5th  largest economy just because we are in the EU.
Not sure I have as much faith in the British 'character' as you Glos.

They'll need an app at the very least. Smile
True  Very Happy

199Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Tue Nov 20 2018, 14:00

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@gloswhite wrote:
@boltonbonce wrote:
@gloswhite wrote:Some good points there DK. Whatever happens now, there will be change and turmoil, but I have faith in the British  character, and that we will overcome the problems. Admittedly some will be fixed quickly, and some will cause problems when sorted in the longer term. We didn't get to be the 5th  largest economy just because we are in the EU.
Not sure I have as much faith in the British 'character' as you Glos.

They'll need an app at the very least. Smile
True  Very Happy
All I hear from younger family members is ,'You can get an app for that'.

Give me strength.

200Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 12:49

Natasha Whittam

Natasha Whittam
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Looks like the woman has finally sorted Brexit. What a leader! They should build a statue of her.

201Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 12:54

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
The Mogg and his chums are looking very foolish.

202Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 13:35

Norpig

Norpig
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
It's not that difficult for Mogg to look foolish though is it?

Brexit negotiations - Page 7 9k=

203Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 14:15

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
Very Happy
Maybe we should all take Bill's advice.

204Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 15:39

Cajunboy

Cajunboy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
Thanks, I'm just going to bake some bread.

205Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 15:53

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Cajunboy wrote:Thanks, I'm just going to bake some bread.
French bread?

206Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 15:58

Sluffy

Sluffy
Admin
I always thought Gyles Brandreth predicted accurately all that has happened over the last two years, even what is happening right now!



207Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 16:46

Cajunboy

Cajunboy
Andy Walker
Andy Walker
@boltonbonce wrote:
@Cajunboy wrote:Thanks, I'm just going to bake some bread.
French bread?
It's all we eat in Poulton-le-Fylde.

208Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 19:31

boltonbonce

boltonbonce
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
@Cajunboy wrote:
@boltonbonce wrote:
@Cajunboy wrote:Thanks, I'm just going to bake some bread.
French bread?
It's all we eat in Poulton-le-Fylde.
I've noticed. And there's always a suspiciously strong smell of onions.

Brexit negotiations - Page 7 1851-5196

209Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Thu Nov 22 2018, 22:19

xmiles

xmiles
Youri Djorkaeff
Youri Djorkaeff
@Natasha Whittam wrote:Looks like the woman has finally sorted Brexit. What a leader! They should build a statue of her.

Let's wait until she gets it through parliament first.

210Brexit negotiations - Page 7 Empty Re: Brexit negotiations on Fri Nov 23 2018, 14:31

Natasha Whittam

Natasha Whittam
Nat Lofthouse
Nat Lofthouse
It will get through Parliament because most of the British public, whether they wanted to leave or not, just want the whole thing sorted so we can move on.

I've started building that stature of our great leader, I'm hoping to get permission to display it on top of Whittam Towers.

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